Rothko Inspired Rainbows

 

Rothko rainbows 2

Today’s Story Time read aloud was “The Rainbow Goblins” by Ul de Rico. This is a stunningly illustrated book that tells the story of the Valley of the Rainbows and the greedy goblins who want to steal all the beautiful colors.

Rainbows are magical and even the scientific explanation for their origin is the stuff of wonder. Light streaming through water molecules at just the right angle to bend light? Amazing. White light that actually carries the spectrum of colors? Incredible. Nature and science really are magic and so is art.

You can watch the read aloud video and see how I created the mini rainbows above at Sea of Visibility on FB.

Rothko was an abstract artist who expressed emotions with color. he also tried to make viewers feel certain emotions only using color.

When I was playing with lipstick, eye shadow and nail polish to blend and combine colors, I was reminded of Mark Rothko’s abstract color paintings. Just trying out different color combinations and blending the different pigments together made me happy. I thought I knew what result I would get but was pleasantly surprised every time.

Here are two great sites to visit to learn more about the artist Mark Rothko and to make your own rainbow experiments.

Rainbow Science  and   Who is Mark Rothko?

Here are some more mini rainbows I made today. How do they make you feel?

Thanks so much for visiting.

Keep creating!

Patty

Math with Mondrian

Mondrian math supplies

Hey everyone!

Today I am working on my favorite art/math project! Using Piet Mondrian’s work to understand math is nothing new. His geometric masterpieces lend themselves to learning so many math concepts.  Even as I was preparing my samples for today, I  came up with a few new variations that I am looking forward to trying once we get back to the classroom!

Supplies – This is a list of only some of the materials I used. You can simplify or expand as you like. The more you experiment, the better!

Paper, scissors, construction paper, ruler, glue, colored pencils, markers, colored sand, paint, Popsicle sticks, cardboard, graph paper etc.

You can create your own version of a Mondrian using paper and pencil, colored pencil, markers etc. You can also make a textured Mondrian by using sand, glitter, pop sticks and cardboard.

Steps – using a straight edge, draw rectangles and squares on your canvas (drawing surface, cardboard). Refer to Piet Mondrian’s Composition with Red, Blue and Yellow for inspiration. Here’s a link to some more of his work and about the artist – Mondrian for Kids – Slideshare

Mondrian composition with red, blue and yellow

Once you have filled your canvas with the composition, choose your colors and add them. As you can see, the artist left white space and always used bold black lines to break up the canvas. Of course, you can be as creative as you like and add different colors too, just not green. Do you know why Mondrian didn’t use the color green?

Math activities – apart from the obvious geometry found in Mondrian’s work, we also see perpendicular lines, straight lines, intersecting and parallel lines. There is definitely one super easy math concept that your Mondrian inspired work can help you learn.

Finding the Area of a square or rectangle

Supplies graph paper ( print some out here free printable graph paper online), colored pencils, markers of crayons, ruler or any straight edge.

Steps – draw your Mondrian inspired artwork directly on the graph paper. before you color in your shapes, challenge yourself to find the area  by counting the squares up (vertical) and across (horizontal) of the squares and rectangles. You can multiply (area = length x width or width x height) or even count each square in the shape. Here is a fun link to use for practice – Square Area Interactive.

Mondrian has inspired so many math activities and you can see a few of them at the links below, and enjoy some other math activities with artists like Alexander Calder and Pablo Picasso!

Math with Mondrian, Calder and more

Here’s a really tough one to challenge yourself! –

Advanced Mondrian Math Puzzles

I’d love to see your Mondrian inspired work and how you extended this activity.

Google Arts and Culture App – Mondrian Composition with Grid #1

The Google Arts and Culture app has so many activities available that it’s impossible to list everything! Their content also changes so be sure to check it out the link quick!!

Be sure to check out the video for this project and post your creations @artoutofanything on FB and Instagram.

See you next week , stay healthy and create!

Patty

DIY – Mural Wall

Rainbow Hand – Mural Wall

Happy Tuesday!

Today’s video features a very popular activity in my house – drawing on the wall!

No, I am not advocating drawing on walls BUT there is a way for your little ones to be able to feel a little subversive while keeping your walls clean.

There are also wonderful muralists like Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring that can inspire you. Excellent, age appropriate resources on these wonderful artists, just for kids, can be found here –

https://kids.britannica.com/students/article/Jean-Michel-Basquiat/628054

Radiant Child – youtube

Who is Keith Haring? – Tate Kids

Visit @artoutofanything on FB or Instagram for the complete video how-to.

Here’s what you will need to make your very own “mural” – 

Paper – any paper including, but not limited to; construction paper, copy paper, wrapping paper, drawings that have outgrown the fridge, old magazines, paper bags, recycling etc.

Tape – masking tape, scotch tape, first aid tape – you get the idea. 

A wall – I used the wall in my studio next to the guest bed (formerly my son’s room), but you can use any wall in your home that is easily accessible. 

Things to draw with – the usual suspects will work, but why not try out something new like old lipstick or chalk dipped in water for a new experience? 

Using things other than for their intended purpose, allows you and your kiddos to be creative thinkers and explore different approaches to problem solving. These are very important skills that are beneficial to understanding traditional subjects and navigating through life.

Process –

  • Attach all the paper together with tape so it resembles a quilt. You can make it as long and as wide (high) as you like.
  •  Tape the paper “quilt” to the wall. Experiment with taping it higher on the wall or lower.
  • Begin your mural! Have you ever noticed how children tend to draw small images, regardless of how big the canvas is? Encourage your child to experiment with scale/size and create larger images. What happens when the paper is high on the wall and they stand to draw as opposed to when the paper is low on the wall and they can sit and draw? What do they enjoy most?

This mural wall can be left up for children to add to whenever they need a break or feel like adding some drawings to it. This is a very popular activity at our summer camp, we usually end up with at least 5 or 6 collaborative murals by the end of the season.

In keeping with out motto – “work with what you have” we have also found a great use for our completed murals. Once the paper is full of your stunning artwork, you can take it down and use it as a tablecloth or drop cloth for more art play. You can also cut it up and frame smaller pieces of it or make cards out of them! Why not experiment with using an old tablecloth or sheet instead of paper?

A brand new mural wall is then only a few minutes and some paper and tape away 🙂

Have fun, stay safe and follow us on FB and Instagram @artoutofanything for more videos and activities.

Keep creating,

Patty

Yes! You can play ball in the house!

NEWSPAPER BALLS

Hi again!

Today we learned about shapes using paper and tape. When I make art I love to use re purposed materials. Anything that is lying around the house is a potential new art supply.

Having a look in my recycling bin, I grabbed a few sheets of newspaper and made some pretty awesome newspaper balls! But they’re not just newspaper, they are soccer balls, basketballs, baseball, bowling balls even juggling balls. You can make them as big or small as you like.

Apart from learning new vocabulary words like sphere and 3 dimensional, you can also explore some math concepts by comparing size and weight. Try adding different kinds of “paper” like aluminum foil, tissue paper, plastic wrap, even old holiday wrapping paper works well and will give you a chance to explore textures and experiment with how well they work to help the balls bounce off surfaces, but not off each other!

Can you make a football? A Frisbee? Ok those last 2 are not spheres but you can see how easy it would be to take this project to the next level 🙂

Remember – work with what you have.

Visit @artoutofanything on FB to see the video, learn more and don’t forget to show me what you made!

Thanks so much for visiting and I’ll be back next week,

Patty