Spiders, Bugs and Insects! Oh my!

Hello, hello!

Today’s Story Time Read Aloud is Miss Spider’s Wedding by David Kirk. You can see the video read aloud and video tutorial at Art Out of Anything on FB  and Instagram.

I love insects. I love reading about them, drawing them and creating mashed up illustrations of insects and other animals! David Kirk’s stunning paintings that illustrate Miss Spider’s Wedding, remind us how beautiful insects are and also how beautiful a little feeling called love is too.

When I decided to make insects for this project, I didn’t have any clay or dough and I thought maybe other people might not have any either. SO, I have made some simple insects using paper, tape, straws, shish kabob sticks, paint and glue. You can also use chopsticks and Q-Tips or pencils.

Below you will find links to sites that show you how to make your own dough at home, learn more about insects and some free downloadable templates for inspiration.

Steps – 

  • Wings – I am sure you have probably seen this classic symmetry activity. It’s the easiest and prettiest way to get pairs of wings for your insect.
  1. fold a piece of paper in half
  2. place paint, directly from bottle or tube, near the center crease of the paper.
  3. add as many colors as you like but make sure you are using small amounts of paint. You don’t want the paint to leak out!
  4. once you have all the paint colors you like, close the paper on the crease so it’s folded again
  5. begin spreading out the paint in between the two halves of the paper.

You can see the  paint faintly through the paper and can shape the wings by using your hands and spreading the paint. Open your paper and you have your wings!

Finished “butterfly wings” symmetry.

In my project, I used an 8.5″ x 11″ piece of copy paper and once dry, was able to cut out 3 pairs of wings.

I also made a “bee” using paper and tape. It’s easy to mold paper into shapes and hold together using tape. You can watch me complete that little bee on the video.

Science Connection –  Insects are some of the most interesting species on the planet. Here are some links to learn about the difference between insects, bugs and more – 

Bug or Insect?Facts About Bugs and InsectsParts of an Insect,  14 of the World’s Wildest Insects

FREE downloadable templates – BeetleSpiderLadybug  

Play dough and clay recipes – Recipe #1Recipe #2No cook Recipe #3

Here are some amazing insects that some of my students made using Model Magic, a template and cardboard.

 

Here’s one of my insect mash-ups – it’s an illustration I did for one of my favorite books,  Something Wicked This Way Comes by Ray Bradbury.

SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES
How many insects or bugs can you find in this picture?

Enjoy making your bugs and insects and I will be back with new art projects next week. Follow us on FB and Instagram for new videos!

Thanks for visiting and keep creating!

Patty

A Monoprint and an extra project!

supplies
Suggestions for supplies.

Hello everyone!

Today we have 2 projects to explore, one that can be used over and over again and one that is unique and one of a kind.

Finger painting is a great activity for kids of all ages and adults too. It provides a wonderful sensory experience and promotes fine motor skills while providing a relaxing, creative activity. It’s not as popular as other art projects unfortunately because it is most definitely super messy. But what if I told you, you could finger paint without turning your hands (and maybe your furniture) into a paint palette? ?

Well you can, with some simple supplies!

No Mess Finger Painting

Supplies –

  • Plastic baggie (preferably Ziploc although you can tape the top of the baggie to prevent any paint squeezing out).
  • Paint – acrylic, tempera, washable paint is best. If you have no paint, you can mix up some instant pudding or use one of the recipes listed in the links below to make your own “paint”.
  • Your hands!
  • Optional – Q-Tips, end of paintbrush handle or pencil

Steps – 

  • Pour paint into the plastic baggie. If the paint is too thick, mix it with a splash of water before you pour it into the baggie. Paint should not be too thin.
  • Carefully squeeze out all excess air before sealing bag. Add tape to the top to prevent any leaking.
  • Once your baggie is ready, you can use your fingers, Q -Tips, or the rounded end of the paintbrush handle or pencil eraser end to create designs.
clean fingerpainting baggie
This activity is great for learning about color mixing.

It’s fun to “paint” by removing, or “erasing”  pigment instead of adding pigment, by moving the paint around and creating designs. This activity is also a wonderful way to explore elements of art such as color (primary and secondary colors) and negative space (the space around and between the subject of an image).

It’s super relaxing and fun to watch the colors mix and spread. Plus you can “erase” designs by gently rubbing and moving the paint around. You get a new canvas to create!

Our second project today is a MONOPRINT, a form of printmaking where the design or drawing can only be made once.

supplies and finished work
Some supplies we used.

Supplies – 

  • Cookie sheet or aluminum tray. I used a pizza tray today in my video, but I usually use disposable aluminum trays in my workshops. As long as your paint is non-toxic and water soluble you can always clean the tray after using.
  • Paint or a homemade substitute (see link below)
  • Mark making materials like Q-Tips, combs, fingers, plastic utensils etc.
  • Paint spreader – you can use a brush, stiff cardboard, paint roller or a brayer (if you have one!)
  • Paper

Steps –

  • Spread paint evenly onto the tray with your paint spreader. The paint should be opaque and smooth, a nice thin layer is best.
  • Use your mark making tools to create a design. Try to work quickly since the paint may begin to dry and that would prevent getting a good print.
  • Your design will be reversed, so remember that if you are using words.
  • Once your design is ready, place the paper on top and gently burnish (rub) the surface of the paper to transfer the design from the tray to the paper.
  • Pull the print – as you’ve seen in our previous videos, gently lift off the paper, starting at the top from the tray.
finished monoprint
Our finished Monoprint. The image will be reversed, so be mindful if you are using words.
  • As you can see above, some of my paint had started to dry so I ended up with a slightly uneven print. Sort of looks like a woodcut! This can also be called a reverse print because the design is made by the lines where there is no paint.

Here are some links to learn more about the elements of art and ways to make your own paint.

Favorite Homemade Paint Recipes

Elements of Art for grades 6-12

Free printable Elements of Art book for grades PK – 5

Be sure to visit, like and follow us on FB   and Instagram  for weekly project videos and read aloud story time for all ages. Contact Patty at eljaiekart@gmail.com to learn more about our professional development workshops, now available via Zoom and/or Google Hangouts.

Thanks for visiting and keep creating!

Patty

 

 

 

 

Art is Messy – action painting with yarn

Happy Earth Day!

Today’s art project video can be viewed at Art Out of Anything on FB and @artoutofanything on Instagram.

 With this project we continue to offer art activities that you can do at home or in the classroom with much of what you already have on hand so you can work with what you have!
Action painting is exactly what it sounds like, painting with movement. 
Jackson Pollock was a painter know for his action paintings. You can see him painting and hear him talking about his artistic process in this video – SFMOMA – Paintings have a life of their own.
You can also visit his house on the east end of Long Island in NY or virtually at  Pollock-Krasner House. His wife, Lee Krasner was also an amazing artist.
Pollock’s paintings are not only colorful and lively, they also contain fractals, which is another example of how math can be found everywhere in art.
Today we will make our own action painting using yarn and paint.
Project Steps –  the steps for this project work best being viewed but I will give you the abridged version here.
  • gather your materials – I used acrylic paint, pieces of yarn and embroidery thread, clothespins, cups, paper and paint.
  • cover you work space with an old sheet or tablecloth or even a garbage bag.
  • pour paint into cups, add a splash of water if paint is too thick
  • clothespins are used to pick up yarn pieces and dip them into the paint cups. Make sure to coat the yarn as much as possible with the paint.
  • once your yarn is ready, lift it out of the cup with the clothespin and drop it onto the paper that is your canvas. You can also drag the yarn on the paper or shake it so it create splatters.
  • I would suggest leaving the yarn on the paper until you have completed your piece so that the paint has time to soak into the paper. This also creates a more cohesive finished piece.
  • once you feel your piece is done, remove the yarn using the clothespins or your fingers. You can even use chopsticks or tweezers!

You can lay your finished masterpiece flat to dry or hang it. If you have runny paint on your piece, your painting will change as the paint drips while it is hanging. Just be sure to place some newspaper or another garbage bag under the hanging painting to catch the drips.

I mentioned the word fractals earlier. A fractal is a never ending pattern. They can be found in math equations and in the world all around us from tree branches to snowflakes. Scientists who have analyzed Pollock’s seemingly random placement of paint, have discovered these never ending patterns in his work. Can you think of how that would happen when he was dripping and dropping paint and lots of other objects into his paintings without any obvious intentional placement? I have my own theory but you have to watch the project video for that!

Here are some links to really interesting articles about their theories and what they found –

Discover Magazine

A Scholarly Blog

Here are some interactive sites where you can see how fractals work and create your own –

Experimenting with FractalsMath Fairy, Kids  , Interactive Fractal Machine

Here are some links to online drawing tools to create your own, not so messy action painting –

Scratch MITNick jr. Drawing

I hope you enjoy getting messy and exploring the wonderful world of fractals and art.

Follow us on FB and Instagram @artoutofanything for weekly videos and activities. You can also contact us at eljaiekart@gmail.com or direct message us at FB and Instagram if you are interested in remote professional development workshops or homeschooling workshops.

Thanks for visiting and keep creating!

Patty

 

 

 

Drawing with Shapes!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Hi everyone!

Today’s story time read aloud is about a little frog that would rather be any other animal than who he is. It takes a crafty wolf to remind him why we should be happy to be who we are.
I love this book because the illustrator gave the characters so much personality. It’s also a very important message for everyone.

You can see the video read aloud @Art Out of Anything on FB.

Looking at the illustrations in this book reminds me of how easy it is to learn how to draw animals, or just about anything, by breaking the object down into simple shapes.

In the slideshow above you can see how I used circles, squares, rectangles and triangles to draw some of the animals found in the story.

If you look at the world around you, you will notice that geometry is everywhere!

Here’s a link to a more detailed explanation and drawing practice  – Art Tutor Blog

Try this free downloadable template that uses triangles and circles, to get started on your own animal drawing – Shapes drawing template

Connect the groups of dots and see what animal you get. Can you guess what animal it is?I did leave out one shape, see if you can tell which shape fits to complete the drawing.

There’s a new art project video every Tuesday and Thursday @artoutofanything on FB and Instagram and a new Story Time every Saturday.

Thanks so much for visiting today and keep creating!

Patty

Collage of Chance

 

small collage

Hello everyone!

Today we will be exploring art and math by creating a collage made entirely by chance. Or was it?

This project is geared toward early childhood classes and young kiddos. It allows them to experiment and explore mathematical theories like probability. Although your little one may be too young to question whether randomness exists, we can certainly introduce them to the idea of making predictions and observing results using glue, yarn and paper!

 

Supplies

  • paper, card stock, cardboard or any other surface you will use to be your canvas.
  • glue – liquid glue works best.
  • collage materials – I used different lengths and thicknesses of yarn, thread, rope and tape. You can also use different types of paper. You can even use dental floss!

supplies collage

Steps – 

  • art is messy – make sure you spread newspaper or a plastic garbage bag on your work surface
  • lay your canvas down and cover with glue. I don’t paint the glue on because I’ve found that the collage materials need a thicker line of glue to adhere to the canvas.
  • the application of the glue can also be “random” by squeezing the glue bottle and moving your hand around the canvas or squeezing and letting the glue drip where it will .
  • once your canvas is covered to your liking, start by dropping your collage materials, one by one onto the canvas.
  • try dropping the yarn or paper close to the canvas, from farther away or even stand on a chair and drop them onto the canvas placed on the floor!
large collage
I used yarn, ribbon, paper strips and even duct tape to make my collage.

The idea is that the collage materials will land where gravity takes them and so the result will be a collage that is determined by chance and not by the purposeful placing of the materials.

Once your collage is dry, you can preserve it by covering it with clear plastic wrap or paint on a coat of watered down white glue.

2 finished collage
I covered my collage with Press ‘N Seal. You can cover the finished piece before the glue dries. Little hands love to pick off the materials before they are dry. Cut a piece a little bigger than the collage overlap and tape edges to the back.

 

Project Extensions – 

  • can you predict where a piece of yarn or paper will land?
  • does the placement depend on how thick or thin the material is?
  • do you see any pattern in how the pieces landed or where they landed on the canvas?
  • if you use yarn and thread, once dry your collage makes for a great sensory experience too. The glue and yarn make interesting textures!

Art History – Jean (Hans) Arp was an artist that was part of the DADA movement. One of his most famous artworks is; Untitled (Collage with Squares Arranged according to the Laws of Chance). 

Jean-Arp.-Collage-with-Squares-279x395

You can learn more about Hans Arp and his technique here – MOMA Learning

I hope you are enjoying the projects and getting a chance to watch the videos at https://www.facebook.com/artoutofanything/

See you next week, on Tuesday, when we will be learning about Jackson Pollock!

Thanks for visiting and keep creating!

Patty

 

Drawing with Glue

supplies 1

You can watch the step by step video for this project at Art Out of Anything on FB  and Instagram. New projects posted every week on Tuesday and Thursday!

Today’s project is an old favorite, with a new twist. In keeping with our motto of “work with what you have”, drawing with glue just got a little interesting.

Supplies –

  • white glue
  • paper – construction paper, card stock, cardboard or all of these
  • sand
  • glitter

Sand and glitter will be used as your pigments (colors). No sand? No glitter? You’ve  got great powdered pigments right in your kitchen cabinets!

I used the following:

  • salt
  • sugar
  • pepper
  • condiments like onion powder, paprika, nutmeg, cinnamon, dry mustard, ground or instant coffee etc.
cups with powder pigment 2
I put my powdered pigments into little plastic shot glasses, but you can use yours straight from the original containers too.

A great addition to this project is to have some music playing and “draw” to the music. Music and art are very good companions. It’s interesting to see how different kinds of music can inspire you and your kiddo to create.

 

As you can see, there are so many different ways you can experiment with pigments and one of the most interesting results, is that you end up with a pretty fragrant work of art. See if you can find condiments that work well together in terms of their scents. Nutmeg, cinnamon and sugar might just inspire you to make a glue drawing of cupcakes or a pumpkin pie!

Resources and Project Extension – When I do this project in an Art Out of Anything workshop, I always start by introducing a popular art from from India called Rangoli. Here’s a link to the history of this beautiful art form, the traditional process and free templates to download to try your own – https://www.dltk-kids.com/world/india/mrangoli.htm

Once all of your amazing artwork is completely dry, shake off any excess pigment and if needed, carefully brush off any left over pigment with a soft paintbrush or tissue.

One last thing, no white glue? No problem, glue sticks work just fine too.

glue stick fish 13
Glue sticks dry much faster than liquid glue so you have to work a little faster, this would be a good time to play some peppy music!

Thanks so much for visiting.

Keep creating,

Patty

Storytime and Paper Puppets

3 Little pigs build their dreamhouse

Today at Sea of Visibility on FB I posted my first Story Time Art Project; The 3 Little Pigs Build Their Dream House. Click on the link – https://www.facebook.com/seaofvisibility/ to watch.

And of course, you can also see it at Art Out of Anything on FB.

Fairy Tales, we all know how they begin – Once Upon a Time, and we know how they end – They lived happily ever after…
But did you know that everything in between can change? We’ve all seen many different versions of Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty etc.

Creating their own versions of well known stories helps kiddos develop comprehension, vocabulary and writing skills. Critical thinking skills are also engaged as they analyze text and re imagine a different path for the characters and maybe even a whole new plot!

Today I will show you just one way you can make your own paper puppets to inspire your version of a favorite fairy tale.

Project Materials – Our motto “work with what you have” is a perfect guide to finding supplies and materials that you can re purpose for art making.

  • Card stock – any sturdy paper will do including construction paper or my favorite cereal boxes.
  • Popsicle sticks – you can also use straws or even pencils
  • Tape and/ or glue
  • Decorative Paper – I used scrapbook paper but you can also use pictures cut out of magazines, old books or you can draw your own.
  • Colored pencils – any drawing tool to add color and designs if you want to.
  • Scissors

Project Steps – These are my characters; Chip, Skip, Clyde and Leonard E. Wolf. I drew my characters but you can use any of the above mentioned materials to create your own. Prince? Princess? Dragon?

characters 3 little pigs

Once I drew my characters and colored them in, I carefully cut them out and glued them onto Popsicle sticks, you can also use tape to attach them.

puppet template back

In my story, I needed 3 houses, each one a little sturdier than the other. After drawing and cutting out my houses, I used recycled materials I had around the house to finish my puppets. For the “straw” house I glued on fabric scraps, yarn and straws. I also added a little glitter on the roof to make it sparkly. The house of “sticks” was a tree house made with straws, toothpicks and broken Popsicle sticks. Finally, the brick house was made using some sticky vinyl and broken DVD’s. I got lucky having the sticky vinyl around but could have used colored glitter instead. Please be careful when cutting up DVD’s or CD’s as they tend to like to crack in interesting ways – definitely a grown up activity! Once done I attached astick  Popsicle again to each.

houses 3 little pigs

The Setting for my version of this story was an enchanted forest. I was very lucky to have a really good selection of scrapbook paper that I cut into the shapes of trees and a half moon to complete my background. If you don’t have the perfect paper lying around, then you can draw or use clip art or coloring book pages to complete your backdrop. I have added some resource links at the bottom to get you started!

forest backdrop

Finally, Leonard E. Wolfe’s new home. Again, I used scrapbook paper and sticky vinyl. Here’s a picture of his tower with the light shining through the windows. Colored tissue paper is perfect for stained glass windows. You can even paint or color white tissue paper to create the effect of stained glass!

wolf tower    wolf tower window

Now YOU are ready to make your own paper puppets and create your own story!

Here are some links for templates and coloring pages you can use for inspiration –

Fairy Tale Printable story coloring pages 

Here are free printable templates of the characters in my story. I would love to see your version!

Chip        Skip        Clyde    Leonard E. Wolfe

“Straw” House    House of “sticks”   Stained Glass House       Wolfe’s Dream House

If you’re having a hard time getting your story started, here’s a great place that provides all kinds of fun and interesting writing prompts for inspiration – Writing Prompts for Kids

Thank you soooo much for visiting and I hope to see what you come up with! You can post your creations at Art Out of Anything on FB and Instagram. Be sure to follow us for complete videos and more projects!

We are proud to collaborate with Sea of Visibility, a community collective that seeks to support and encourage expression through the arts.
As a member and collaborator, I am thrilled to be a part of creating engagement and providing support through the arts, especially at a time when we all understand how important the arts are to our physical and mental well-being..
Be sure to visit and like Sea of Visibility on FB for our weekly programming schedule.

Keep creating,

Patty