Landscape and Perspective

It’s great to collaborate with other organizations and fantastic artists. I had so much fun presenting a workshop with Milestales founder AmaYawson in Far Rockaway.

We started the workshop with a few breathing exercises to get us in a calm, focused state. Arts as meditation is not a new concept and many of us achieve state of relaxed, focused concentration without even realizing it, most people commonly refer to it as being “in the zone”. Here are just a few of the amazing landscape paintings the students created using 1 point perspective. They were great!

 

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Sandy Mobiles

This week at our Friday workshop we looked at the work of one of my favorite artists, Alexander Calder. 
Usually when I introduce Calder, we make shapes out of paper or cardboard for our mobiles. This time I decided to use make up sponges instead. I love the colorful ones in funky shapes but the white ones were easier to find in bulk.
The kiddos colored them with markers and stuck gardening wire into each one. Balance was a tough concept but I think they did pretty well. They were all excited to take them home. I call that a success ;)

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Winter Workshops

Art history inspires and encourages exploration of found and re-cycled materials.

A Review of Student Work

We have been so busy, it’s been a while since our last post. I would like to showcase some of the amazing work the students have created at a few different venues with traditional and non-traditional materials. We have everything from giant food to insects.

Wake up!

Sir Ken Robinson’s mission is to “ transform the culture of education and organizations with a richer conception of human creativity and intelligence. ”

I had the opportunity to see him speak in person almost 10 years ago and it lit a fire in me that has only grown. Thank you for verbalizing what I and many others had been struggling to articulate.

Please visit his site here and wake up!

http://sirkenrobinson.com

Found Object Printing

The best thing about inheriting someone’s classroom is what they leave behind in the closet. I have had these cut pieces of thin rubber strings sitting, waiting for some inspiration. We started creating a “printing block” using longish strands of yarn but the printing plate needed something extra. A little masking tape, paint and voila, a new use for those rubber “spaghetti” strips!

We used the same technique of painting the printing block, burnishing and lifting the print from the plate. The result can be hit or miss but after all, exploring and understanding what doesn’t work is an important part of the process as well.

 

Monoprints

Printing is a great technique to explore with young children. There are so many different ways to create prints and the opportunity for many “happy accidents”. We started our printing unit with a simple monoprint. A monoprint is a print that can only be made once, as opposed to most other printing techniques which allow for multiples.little ones.

As always, we chose re purposed materials in the form of a plastic serving tray and white scrap paper. Using tempera paint, we spread a thin application of blue paint directly on the serving tray. This can be done with a brush or a brayer, we used a 2″ foam brush. make sure there is enough paint to cover the size paper you are using and the application is thick enough to make marks in, but not too thick that you will lose the image. You may want to practice this before you start the project with your little ones.

To make  their design, I supplied the kiddos with Q-tips, which they used to “draw” their image in the paint. It’s interesting when they realize they are “drawing” by removing paint instead of adding it. Once their image is created, we place the paper on top of the image and very gently, this was the hardest part, burnish or smooth down the paper to lift the image onto the paper. We just used our hands instead of a brayer or other tool because I wanted to make sure the entire image was transferred and make it more of a tactile experience as well. Don’t press too hard and don’t move the paper. You can see the image faintly once there is enough paint transferred onto the paper.  At this point, life the paper gently and slowly from one end and voila! A lovely print of their original drawing.

One thing to keep in mind, it will be a reverse image so keep it simple and stay away from words or letters. The lovely examples below are all from my Kindergarten class.

The look of wonder on their faces when they see their print is priceless 🙂

Monoprint K 3
Portrait J
Monoprint K 2
Abstract L
Monoprint K1
Playing A